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I am a Canadian Kennel Club Canine Good Neighbour Evaluator.  In fact I was the first person to become a certified CGN Evaluator under the CKC program.

If you would like me to organize a test for your club or event or if you would like me to simply show up and do evaluations give me a call

416-574-8635

or email me

naomi@lewenhart.com

For more information about the Canine Good neighbour program follow this link to the Canadian Kennel Club

I also offer the Urban Dog Test which I designed to test dogs in off leash parks.

URBAN DOG TEST

A “Virtual Reality” Test For Dogs Living In An Urban Environment. 

The handler may use positive motivators during the test.  Use of motivators that cannot be carried in a pocket is disallowed.  The dog should respond swiftly to the handler’s commands and during recall exercises must return and remain close to the handler.  Any dog that, in the opinion of the evaluator, shows undue aggression or appears out of control may not receive a certificate.  It should be understood that the dog will be under observation from the moment the evaluator sees the dog.  Behaviour exhibited outside of the test area will be monitored.

This test is limited to dogs twelve months of age and older.  Equipment necessary would be a buckle collar or chain and a four to six foot leash.  No head halters, body harnesses, prong collars, or extendible leads.

1.   Recall With People (Children and Adults) As A Distraction      

A volunteer crowd of people will stand and mill about in the test area.  A good “crowd” will have at least one person reacting with fear to the presence of the dog and one person limping or walking with a cane.  The “crowd” may interact with the dog and even call the dog to come for a pat, but must not interfere with the recall of the dog.  The handler will be asked to remove the dog’s leash and release the dog.  For the purposes of this evaluation the dog should be under no particular command.  If the dog goes toward the people the handler will recall the dog.  If the dog does not approach the people the evaluator may ask the crowd to entice the dog closer before the handler gives the recall command.  This test would show that the dog will return to the handler when distracted by people.

2.   Recall With Dogs as A Distraction. 

Three to four dogs taking the test will be allowed off leash together.  Once they have gotten to know each other and are paying less attention to their handlers the evaluator will ask the handlers to issue the recall.  The handlers may issue more than one command.  The dogs must return to the handlers within a reasonable amount of time.  Dogs will fail the exercise if they do not return to the handler or if they demonstrate undue aggression.  This test demonstrates that the dog is under control when around other dogs.  The evaluator will use caution and common sense in grouping dogs to be off leash. 

3.  The Rolling and Running Prey Drive Test  

This test demonstrates that the dog is under control in an off leash area frequented by other people engaged in sports activities.  The handler must have control of the leash during this exercise.  At least two, but preferably more, of the following; a jogger, stroller, rollerblader or bicycle would go past the dog and handler.  The dog may show interest, but if it goes toward the distractions it must be recalled.  The dog must respond quickly to the handler and must not lunge at the distraction nor give chase.  The handler may issue a command or otherwise speak to the dog as the distraction passes.  Handlers should use the leash as a last resort, voice command is preferred.  No toy or food may be used for this exercise.  Other distractions such as skateboards, people warming up for exercise, cross-country skiing, tennis playing or anything common in the area of the test may be substituted for one of the above distractions.

4.  Willingness to Release A Distraction Article                             

The evaluator throws a number of distracting articles on the ground near the dog and handler.  If the dog ignores the articles the exercise is completed.  If the dog goes for any of the articles the handler may command the dog to release or physically remove the article from the dog’s mouth.  The dog must demonstrate a willingness to release the article to the handler.  If the article is damaged the dog fails the exercise.  It is not necessary for the dog to place the article in the handler’s hand or at the handler’s feet.  The handler then picks up the article and returns it to the evaluator, or leaves the article on the ground.  The handler must show awareness of their dog’s behavior and temperament by demonstrating the control necessary to ensure the dog does not take the article a second time.  Acceptable articles for an evaluator to use are; ball, Frisbee, stick, mitten, hat, child’s toy, pop bottle, handbag.  Other distraction articles may be submitted at the evaluator’s discretion.

5.   Recall with Food as a Distraction                                                        

A person will be seated or standing in the test area holding a piece of food either at their side or pretending to eat.  The size of dog will determine whether the person sits or stands.  The dog will be walked off leash around the food distraction.  If the dog does not approach the food the exercise is finished.  The handler may issue commands and or speak to the dog during this exercise.  If the dog approaches the food the handler must verbally correct the dog and recall the dog immediately.  The handler may issue as many commands as necessary to get the dog to come within a reasonable amount of time.  If the dog sniffs the food the owner may verbally correct the dog, if the dog touches the food the dog fails the exercise.

6.   Poop and Scoop By-Law Compliance                                                 

The handler must have the equipment necessary to remove any feces left by their dog.  Any device commonly carried by the handler such as plastic bags or commercially produced scoops is acceptable.

 

To receive full certification the dog and handler would also be required to pass the Canadian Kennel Club's Canine Good Neighbour Test, the American Kennel Club’s Canine Good Citizen Test, HABAC’s Canadian Canine Good Citizen Test, or a Temperament Test. Upon successful completion of this test dogs and handlers receive a certificate, suitable for framing, stating that the dog is an Urban Canine Companion (UCC).

This test is the property of Naomi Kane

This test or any portion thereof may not be used or reproduced without the permission of Naomi Kane.

 

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